19th European Spectrum Managment Conference

Event Overview

The 19th European Spectrum Management Conference will take place on 19-20 June 2024 at the Bluepoint in Brussels. 

Registration is now available – secure your place here.

Across 2 days attendees will have the opportunity to be involved in discussions on the key spectrum topics for the region and beyond, through interactive sessions, networking opportunities, an exhibition area and much more.

This event is part of The Global Spectrum Series. The world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences. Click on the images on the left to find out more about the series and to view the photos from last year.

  • Event Photos

    Highlights from the event in Brussels in June 2023
  • Global Spectrum Series

    This event takes place as part of the Global Spectrum Series - the world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences.

Key Themes

Hover over the image to find out more…

  • WRC-23

    Debrief, outcomes and next steps towards WRC-27
  • Spectrum Policy and the EU Digital Single Market

  • Developing the European Spectrum Roadmap for 6G

  • What next for the upper 6GHz band?

  • What is the future shape of spectrum sharing in Europe?

  • Spectrum awards in the 6G era – is it time for a rethink?

  • Meeting the needs of an evolving space and satellite landscape

  • Delivering on the challenge of indoor connectivity

  • Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band

Organisers and Partners

Organised by

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Platinum Partners

Analysys Mason logo 350x194
Amazon logo 350x194
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GSA logo 350x194
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GSOA.png
HPE.png
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Morse Micro logo 350x194
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Omnispace 350x194
Vodafone logo 350x194
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Gold Partners

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Silver Partners

Shure logo 350x194

Refreshment Break Hosts

PIP logo 350x194
thinkRF logo 350x194

Exhibitors

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Knowledge Partners

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NERA logo 350x194

Event Background

For 18 years, The European Spectrum Management Conference has provided the leading neutral platform for spectrum stakeholders policy discussion in the region. This event is taking place as part of The Global Spectrum Series.

In 2023, we welcomed over 200 delegates to Sparks, Brussels. Watch the Event Vlog below to see the highlights from the last edition.

Confirmed Speakers Include

Renate Nikolay 240

Renate Nikolay

Deputy Director General, DG CNECT
European Commission

Mario Maniewicz (opt 2) 240

Mario Maniewicz

Director, Radiocommunication Bureau
ITU

Tonko Obuljen 240

Tonko Obuljen

Chairman
BEREC

Julia Criado NEW 240

Julia Inmaculada Criado Casado

Vice Chair
RSPG

Eric Fournier 240

Eric Fournier

Director for Spectrum Planning and International Affairs
ANFR France

Heidi Himmanen 240

Heidi Himmanen

Co-Chair, Sub-Group for 6G Strategic Vision
RSPG

Chris Woolford 240

Chris Woolford

Chairman, Electronic Communications Committee (ECC)
CEPT

Jessica Quinley NEW 240

Jessica Quinley

Assistant Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
FCC

Jonas Wessel 240

Jonas Wessel

Director, Spectrum Management
Swedish Post & Telecom Agency

David Willis 240

David Willis

Group Director, Spectrum
Ofcom

Detlef Fuehrer NEW 240

Detlef Fuehrer

Director, Spectrum Management and Regulatory Affairs, EMEA
HPE

Martha Suarez 240 (1)

Martha Suarez

President
Dynamic Spectrum Alliance

Luigi Ardito 240

Luigi Ardito

Director, Government Affairs, EMEA
Qualcomm

Erika Tejedor 240

Erika Tejedor

Director of Government and Industry Relations
Ericsson

Guillaume LeBrun 240

Guillaume Lebrun

Global Connectivity Policy
Meta

Glyn Carter 240

Glyn Carter

Future Spectrum Director
GSMA

Martin Brock 240

Martin Brock

Senior Manager, Global Regulatory Policy
Shure

Mindel De La Torre 240

Mindel De La Torre

Chief Regulatory and International Strategy Officer
Omnispace

Andrew Gowans 240

Andrew Gowans

Spectrum Regulatory Policy Lead
Cisco

Alex Epshteyn 240

Alex Epshteyn

Senior Manager, International Regulatory Affairs & Spectrum Engineering
Amazon Kuiper

Agenda

Kindly note any speakers with * are to be confirmed

You can view the agenda in your preferred time zone by selecting it from the list below.
Day 1
2024-06-19
Day 2
2024-06-20
09:00 - 10:00
Opening Keynote Presentations
Opening Keynote Presentations image
Renate Nikolay
Deputy Director General, DG CNECT, European Commission
Opening Keynote Presentations image
Tonko Obuljen
Chairman, BEREC
Opening Keynote Presentations image
Mario Maniewicz
Director, Radiocommunication Bureau, ITU
10:00 - 11:10
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this?

The European Commission White Paper ‘How to master Europe’s digital infrastructure needs?’ was released earlier this year and contained key objectives of looking to create a Digital Single Market in Europe. Part of this involves a proposal for a more integrated governance at EU level for spectrum, including proposals to ‘Europeanise’ spectrum usage licenses for both mobile and satellite. This is not the first time that a proposal along these lines has been put forward, but it has once again placed into the spotlight the institutional structures involving key European level regulatory bodies and the relationship between these and member states. This session will explore what this may mean for the future governance of spectrum in Europe and whether there is a need to revisit the way in which key decisions on spectrum policy are taken. It will look at what the Commission are trying to achieve,  whether the proposals that have been put forward are the best way to deliver this, and, particularly with the current Commission mandate set to end at the end of this year, what can be expected to be the next steps.

  • What benefits could the delivery of a true digital single market for Europe bring?
  • What are the key proposals relating to spectrum management that have been put forward as part of the EU Commission White Paper as they look to deliver on this goal of completing the digital single market?
  • What factors have led to previous attempts to establish greater EU coordination in spectrum management, and to what extent are things different today?
  • Where should the balance lie between decision making at a European and a member state level when it comes to spectrum policy?
  • To what extent should there be more coordination at an EU level in elements such as spectrum licencing, allocation, and authorisations for both IMT and satellite services?
  • What impact could coordinated EU-level awards and/or authorisations have in terms of service provision, coverage, competition, prices for end-users and overall competitiveness of the EU on the global stage?
  • What is the current relationship between key European level regulatory bodies such as CEPT, the European Commission, RSPG, the Radio Spectrum Committee, ETSI, and others? 
  • To what extent is there a need to re-examine these relationships, the institutional structures and mechanisms used when conducting technical preparatory work for EU decisions on spectrum harmonisation or negotiations with other regions (for example, as part of the WRC process)?
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Moderator: Amit Nagpal
Partner, Aetha Consulting
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Representative, Head Unit, Spectrum Policy, European Commission (confirmed – speaker name tbc)
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Chris Woolford
Chairman, Electronic Communications Committee (ECC), CEPT
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Aleksander Soltysik
Chairman, RSPG
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Javier Dominguez Lacasa
Chairman, GSMA Frequencies Working Group
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Natalia Vicente
Vice President, Public Affairs, GSOA
Session 1: Completing the EU Digital Single Market – Is there a need for greater coordination of spectrum policy and the institutional structures that govern this? image
Andrew Gowans
Spectrum Regulatory Policy Lead, Cisco
11:10 - 11:35
Refreshment Break
11:35 - 12:45
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27

Six months have now passed since the crucial World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-23) in Dubai. Stakeholders across Europe and globally have had time to reflect on the decisions that were taken on key agenda items, assess their impact, and consider the next steps. As regulators across Europe and globally face up to the challenge of delivering sufficient spectrum to both satisfy the growing demand for mobile broadband services and meet future requirements for the growth of satellite, WiFi, broadcast, and other key services, these WRC-23 outcomes will play a big part in shaping the future connectivity landscape both in the region and globally. This session will look in detail at the questions and answers that have come out of Dubai and what these mean for member states, European connectivity providers, and citizens, as well as their immediate and long-term connectivity objectives. With the first preparatory meeting for WRC-27 taking place in the week immediately following the conclusion of the WRC-23 discussions, it will also look at the issues that are set to dominate discussions over the next four years, both in Region 1 and internationally, and what this may mean for the development of the spectrum landscape across the European region.

  • What decisions were taken on the key agenda items at WRC-23 for Europe, Region 1 more broadly, and elsewhere in the world?
  • What implications do these decisions have for the allocation of bandwidth to various industry sectors and technologies? In which areas have decisions brought clarity, and where do uncertainties persist?
  • In which agenda items was it not possible to achieve fully coordinated outcomes across Europe and the rest of Region 1, and what mechanisms and footnotes were introduced as a result of this? What flexibilities do these then allow, and what are likely to be the next steps?
  • What were the key goals of the European region, the different member states and the EU going into WRC-23, and to what extent have these objectives been met?
  • What lessons can be gleaned from the conference to inform and improve participation in the following preparatory meetings and future WRCs?
  • Are there improvements that could be made at a CEPT and European level in order to improve the preparatory processes and add additional influence to the European ‘voice’ and positions?
  • Moving forward, what are likely to be the key agenda items and issues to be discussed at WRC-27?
  • What are the first steps that have already begun in the build-up to this, and what are likely to be the key challenges ahead as we build up to 2027?
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Moderator: Mario Maniewicz
Director, Radiocommunication Bureau, ITU
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Stephen Talbot
Chairman of Conference Preparatory Group for WRC-27, CEPT
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Glyn Carter
Future Spectrum Director, GSMA
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Peng Zhao
Vice President, Policy & Regulatory, GSOA
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Luigi Ardito
Global Spectrum Team, GSA
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Martha Suarez
President, DSA
Session 2: WRC-23 – outcomes, impacts and next steps towards WRC-27 image
Vincent Sneed
Senior EU Policy Adviser, EBU, on behalf of Wider Spectrum Group
12:45 - 13:40
Lunch
13:40 - 14:50
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe?

The future of the upper 6GHz band has been hotly debated over the past few years. Recent discussions that took place at WRC-23 highlighted the very different opinions that still remain both at a regional and national level when considering the best solution for the band in the long-term. Across Europe and the rest of Region 1, the decision was taken to identify the entire 6425-7125MHz band for IMT, whilst at the same time including a footnote that recognises that this spectrum is used by wireless access systems such as Wi-Fi. Alongside this, the RSPG has started its work towards the Opinion on the upper 6 GHz long-term vision which is expected early in 2025, and work is ongoing in CEPT on technical studies from a number of different angles to explore the potential feasibility of sharing in the band. Against this backdrop, this session will look at the next steps and at the different approaches and mechanisms that are on the table as a possible solution. It will discuss the viability of each of these and explore whether sharing of some kind in the band is feasible and if it would represent the most appropriate use of spectrum, or if not, then what other options could be considered. Taking all this into account, it will look at the best approach to ensuring the interference free co-existence of mobile, WiFi, and incumbent services across the 6GHz band. What is the right choice for Europe in order to ensure that the economic value of this key spectrum is maximised both in the short and long term?

  • Following the decisions at WRC-23 and also taking into account the Digital Decade Policy Programme, what is the current situation with regards to the upper 6GHz band in Europe?
  • What is the best way forward to ensure that the economic value of this key spectrum is maximised, investments are incentivised and that the efficiency of these key frequencies are met?
  • Is a shared approach of some kind now inevitable (and feasible) in the band? If not, what other options are on the table?
  • What is hybrid sharing and to what extent can a model in this way provide a possible solution? What work has begun across different bodies to study the feasibility of this and to develop harmonised technical conditions for a sharing model?
  • What work alongside this is being done? If a hybrid model proves too complex, could other options such as geographical, time, or band-split sharing also be considered?
  • What work is being done to assess the coexistence of mobile and WiFi systems with incumbent services in this band and in adjacent bands, and how can interference be avoided?
  • Should a single approach apply across Europe or is there scope to identify a framework that allows flexibility for countries to take account of their national priorities?
  • What ‘redlines’ are emerging from both the IMT and WiFi communities, and will it be possible to find a viable sharing model that meets these and the broader connectivity needs of both sides? 
  • How can it be ensured that whatever solution is found provides a ‘win-win’ and not a ‘lose-lose’ scenario, incentivises investment ensure that the economic value of this key spectrum is maximised both in the short and long term?
  • To what extent could the successful adoption of a shared approach to the upper 6GHz band in Europe become a model that in the future other countries and regions around the world may also consider? What benefits could this bring?
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Moderator: Richard Haas
Journalist and Analyst, PolicyTracker
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Meta Pavsek Taskov
Co-chair, working group, delivering long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band, RSPG
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Andreas Johann
Co-chair, working group, delivering long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band, RSPG
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Erika Tejedor
Director of Government and Industry Relations, Ericsson
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Representative, Satellite*
Session 3: Delivering a long-term vision for the upper 6 GHz band – what is the right choice for Europe? image
Detlef Fuehrer
14:50 - 16:00
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem

As the demands of our hyper-connected world outpace the availability of traditional spectrum, spectrum sharing of some kind is set to become increasingly part of the connectivity landscape. Europe has traditionally been slower than some other regions (US, Asia) when it comes to embracing sharing technologies, but there are signs of this changing, with a number of different innovative sharing approaches now being explored across different bands. This session will look at the increasing importance that spectrum sharing may play in meeting future connectivity requirements of technologies such as 6G and WiFi8, and how technological and regulatory advances may help models for sharing to evolve. It will explore different sharing models and techniques, including dynamic access, cognitive radio technologies, licensed shared access models, and unlicensed models like Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) in the US. It will discuss the role of regulators and governments in encouraging innovation and ensuring fair and efficient spectrum use, and overall, it will look at what needs to be done to ensure the delivery of flexible regulatory frameworks and policies can facilitate innovation and responsible spectrum sharing without stifling competition.

  • What have been the factors that have limited spectrum sharing in Europe in the past? Are we starting to see a change in attitude and approach to sharing across the region?
  • How important is it that member states look to coordinate their approaches to sharing, and what benefits could a harmonised shared spectrum regime across Europe bring? What work is being done by different players to deliver this?
  • To what extent can spectrum sharing contribute to addressing the growing demand for bandwidth, especially in the context of evolving technologies and increasing connectivity needs? 
  • How can licensed spectrum holders be incentivised to collaborate and share underutilised resources?
  • What innovative licensing models and approaches have been seen in Europe and the rest of the world, and what lessons can be taken from these? What new plans are under consideration for the future?
  • What mechanisms should regulatory authorities use to monitor and enforce compliance with spectrum sharing agreements to maintain a level playing field among coexisting networks? What changes may be needed to current regulations?
  • Are new spectrum valuation and licencing models needed when operators are going to share the spectrum? What are key factors that spectrum authorities need to take into account?
  • How successful have dynamic spectrum sharing (DSS), cognitive radio, and innovative models such as that seen in the CBRS band in the US been in enabling the sharing of underutilised spectrum while protecting incumbent users? What potential could approaches such as these offer for European countries, and are there already examples at a regional level of the implementation of these mechanisms?
  • What impact can advancements in technologies (such as Next Generation Massive MIMO & AI Driven Systems) have on the feasibility of sharing, and how can Europe ensure that we are in a position to take advantage of these?
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
Moderator: Matthew Newman
Global Chief Correspondent, MLex
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
Jessica Quinley
Assistant Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, FCC
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
David Willis
Group Director, Spectrum, Ofcom
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
Luigi Ardito
Senior Director, Government Affairs, EMEA, Qualcomm
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
Representative, Amazon*
Session 4: Innovative spectrum sharing strategies in the future connectivity ecosystem image
Octavian Popescu
Consultant, EUCOMREG, on behalf of Morse Micro
16:00 - 16:25
Refreshment Break
16:25 - 17:50
Session 5: Delivering on the challenge of indoor connectivity – regulatory and technology solutions

More than 90% of the overall internet traffic and up to 80% of mobile traffic happens indoors. It is vitally important to ensure that seamless, high capacity, reliable, and low latency connectivity is available available for both consumer and industrial users across all indoor situations. However, the sheer variety of buildings, venues, use-cases and stakeholders makes achieving this a complex task. There is no one-size-fits-all solution. This session will explore the specific challenges faced in delivering gigabit indoor connectivity across various scenarios and at the different solutions that are available to tackle these. It will explore the role that different technologies such as 5G, Wi-Fi and fixed access (including FTTH) can play in addressing the diverse needs of indoor connectivity, and at how indoor connectivity fits within the broader scope of the Digital Decade connectivity objectives for 2030. It will explore the technical and economic challenges that have been holding back indoor connectivity to date, and at the different solutions that are available to tackle these and deliver the end user with the seamless connectivity solutions that they require.

  • What can be delivered indoors with current Wi-Fi, 5G and fixed access technologies and spectrum? What can be expected in the future?
  • What are the technical and economic challenges that have been holding back indoor connectivity to date, and what different solutions are available to tackle these?
  • What role can outdoor-in 5G coverage play in complementing WiFi technologies to deliver indoor connectivity? What are the specific technical challenges of this and what solutions are available to tackle these?
  • How can it be ensured that the environmental sustainability of solutions is also considered?
  • To what extent can ‘offloading’ of indoor 5G traffic help reduce the need for outdoor-in connectivity? What options are available to deliver this, and how can mobile operators potentially work alongside other connectivity solutions, such as Wi-Fi providers or neutral hosts, in order to find a solution?
  • How can policymakers work alongside connectivity providers from different sides to improve indoor connectivity and ultimately ensure the needs of all consumer and industrial indoor users are met?

 

Setting the Scene
Setting the Scene image
Representative, Comtel*
Panel Discussion
Panel Discussion image
Julia Inmaculada Criado Casado
Vice Chair, RSPG
Panel Discussion image
Representative, Huawei*
Panel Discussion image
Representative, Mobile Operator*
Panel Discussion image
Guillaume Lebrun
Global Connectivity Policy, Meta
Panel Discussion image
Representative, FTTH*
17:50 - 19:00
Networking Reception hosted by BNE
09:00 - 09:45
Session 6: The Rise of the machines – will AI be the death knell for traditional spectrum managers?

Traditionally, spectrum management has always been handled by humans and has been a manual and time-consuming process. With the increasingly complex and crowded ecosystem that is being seen today, the job of the spectrum manager is becoming increasingly complicated. With regulators and connectivity providers around the world continually on the lookout for more efficient and intelligent spectrum management, this interactive discussion will explore the potential that AI and machine learning could play in automating tasks, enhancing efficiency, and optimising both allocation and network performance. Will AI be the death knell for traditional spectrum managers?

  • What impact could AI have on spectrum management and on decisions on the way spectrum is managed, allocated, and optimised? Will it be the ‘game-changer’ that some predict?
  • Will AI render traditional spectrum managers obsolete, or will we see a future where humans and machines work together to create a more efficient future?
Session 6: The Rise of the machines – will AI be the death knell for traditional spectrum managers? image
Moderator: Amit Nagpal
Partner, Aetha Consulting
Session 6: The Rise of the machines – will AI be the death knell for traditional spectrum managers? image
Moderator: Cameron Currin
Manager, Aetha Consulting
Thinking Point: Setting the Scene Presentation
Thinking Point: Setting the Scene Presentation image
Gérard Pogorel*
Professor of Economics, Télécom Paris
Room-wide discussion

At the end of the session, the audience will be asked to vote:
 
Will AI be the death knell for traditional spectrum managers?
 

  • I can see a future in which the role of the human spectrum manager as we know it today becomes obsolete
  • AI will significantly change how spectrum management is done, but it won’t eliminate the need for human spectrum managers altogether
  • AI may help to automate tasks but human expertise will remain central to spectrum management
09:45 - 10:55
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users

The 600 MHz (470-694 MHz) UHF band is the core band for DTT broadcast services and for audio Programme Making and Special Events (PMSE). IMT however, also see it as an important band to expand coverage of networks, and with this in mind, its future has been widely discussed in Europe over recent years. At WRC-23, a decision was taken to protect broadcast services as the exclusive primary user in the band for the foreseeable future – it will not be on the agenda in Europe for WRC-27 and won’t be looked at again until 2031. In addition, last year, the RSPG released an opinion on the future use of the band beyond 2030 in the EU, which included a recommendation to find a solution that preserves sufficient spectrum for audio PMSE. Against the backdrop of the decisions and recommendations that have now been taken on the 600MHz band, this session will explore what this means for the future use of this spectrum and of those services that use it. With the short-term future settled, this session will explore what this new-found security means for the future of broadcasting and PMSE services in Europe, both in the short and long term. It will look at how innovative new technologies and approaches could be set to shape the future of the broadcast and PMSE sectors, the way in which content is produced and delivered, and the spectrum that is required in order to meet these needs. 

  • What do the outcomes from WRC-23 mean for the future of the band, both in Europe and elsewhere in Region 1?
  • What flexibilities have been built in via the new footnotes? For those countries which signed up to a secondary allocation to mobile services, what does this mean in practice, and under what conditions could services potentially be rolled out in the band?
  • Given the differences in demand for terrestrial broadcast that are seen across Member States and the flexibility now provided by the footnotes, are the chances of a long-term EU harmonised approach in the UHF bands starting to diminish?
  • With the future of terrestrial broadcast now secured in the 600 MHz band until at least 2031, what does this mean for the future shape of broadcast and PMSE in Europe in both the short-term and long-term?
  • How might innovative new services such as 5G Broadcast and WMAS (Wireless Multichannel Audio Systems) potentially change the shape of the media industry and the relationship between broadcast, PMSE, and mobile?
  • Considering the long-term, are there any possibilities for exploring shared use of the UHF band with other services in the future while still ensuring the viability of broadcasting and PMSE?
  • How can innovative technologies and spectrum management techniques be used to accommodate new services while protecting existing users of the UHF band?
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users image
Umberto Mascia*
Co-chair, UHF beyond 2030 Working Group, RSPG
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users image
Jonas Wessel
Director, Spectrum Management, Swedish Post & Telecom Agency - PTS
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users image
Jaume Pujol
Chair, Working Policy Group, BNE
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users image
Martin Brock
Senior Manager, Global Regulatory Policy, Shure
Session 7: Exploring the long-term future of the UHF band and of its users image
Representative, Nokia*
10:55 - 11:20
Refreshment Break
11:20 - 12:30
Session 8: Spectrum management for the new space age: direct-to-device, hybrid networks, and an evolving connectivity landscape

The speed of evolution that has been seen recently in the space sector presents both exciting opportunities and significant challenges for spectrum management. One area that is seeing significant interest is in direct-to-device connectivity (D2D) and the introduction of hybrid networks seeing non-terrestrial connectivity supplementing existing mobile services. This rise in D2D connectivity demands innovative solutions for spectrum allocation, with a number of different approaches being considered in order to update current regulatory frameworks at both national and ITU levels to handle the different connectivity models that are being seen today. This session will examine the current landscape of satellite D2D spectrum access, identify areas for revision, and explore ongoing efforts towards modernising these frameworks. It will explore how regulatory approaches around the world are evolving to adapt to the dynamic space environment and look at how the best approach can be taken in Europe in order to allow all emerging and existing technologies to thrive.

  • What are the key challenges that the emergence of innovative new technologies and systems such as direct-to-device connectivity pose for spectrum managers?
  • What work is taking place around the world to explore the adaptation of existing regulatory frameworks and systems to take these into account, and who is taking the lead?
  • What licensing models and rules are being considered to ensure the protection of spectrum rights for both incumbent users and new market entrants, promote long-term sustainability, ensure equitable access, and facilitate rational and compatible utilisation of orbital and spectrum resources?
  • What key parameters (i.e. licence conditions, power limits, unwanted emission limits) should regulators be taking into account? 
  • What is the situation in Europe? What coordination is being seen at a European level, and who should take the lead in this area?
  • What different bands and access models are being considered for D2D? Is coordination of spectrum bands possible at a regional level? And globally?
  • What work has begun on defining system characteristics of services and sharing conditions with incumbent services?
  • Is the “first-come-first-served” principle in ITU satellite coordination well suited for D2D and other future connectivity models and requirements?
  • With D2D connectivity set for discussion at WRC-27, what is the situation in the interim 4 year period? Where does the balance lie between not stifling innovation but also ensuring the protection of all users on a temporary basis whilst long-term solutions are found?
  • Are we moving towards technology/network-neutral spectrum licences in the medium/long term?
Session 8: Spectrum management for the new space age: direct-to-device, hybrid networks, and an evolving connectivity landscape image
Chris Nickerson
Manager, Analysys Mason
Session 8: Spectrum management for the new space age: direct-to-device, hybrid networks, and an evolving connectivity landscape image
Eric Fournier
Director for Spectrum Planning and International Affairs, ANFR France
Session 8: Spectrum management for the new space age: direct-to-device, hybrid networks, and an evolving connectivity landscape image
Alexander Kühn
Head of Section, International Spectrum Affairs, Spectrum Planning & Innovative Spectrum Usage, BNEtzA
Session 8: Spectrum management for the new space age: direct-to-device, hybrid networks, and an evolving connectivity landscape image
Alex Epshteyn
Senior Manager, International Regulatory Affairs & Spectrum Engineering, Amazon Kuiper